The Old-Fashioned: lowest The popular Story of the World's First Classic Cocktail, with Recipes and Lore outlet sale

The Old-Fashioned: lowest The popular Story of the World's First Classic Cocktail, with Recipes and Lore outlet sale

The Old-Fashioned: lowest The popular Story of the World's First Classic Cocktail, with Recipes and Lore outlet sale
The Old-Fashioned: lowest The popular Story of the World's First Classic Cocktail, with Recipes and Lore outlet sale__after
The Old-Fashioned: lowest The popular Story of the World's First Classic Cocktail, with Recipes and Lore outlet sale__right

Description

Product Description

A complete history of one of the world''s most iconic cocktails--now the poster child of the modern cocktail revival--with fifty recipes for classic variations as well as contemporary updates.

No single cocktail is as iconic, as beloved, or as discussed and fought-over as the Old-Fashioned. Its formula is simple: just whiskey, bitters, sugar, and ice. But how you combine those ingredients—in what proportion, using which brands, and with what kind of garnish—is the subject of much impassioned debate.

The Old-Fashioned is the spirited, delightfully unexpected story of this renowned and essential drink: its birth as the ur-cocktail in the nineteenth century, darker days in the throes of Prohibition, re-ascension in the 1950s and 1960s (as portrayed and re-popularized by Don Draper on Mad Men), and renaissance as the star of the contemporary craft cocktail movement.

Also featured are more than forty cocktail recipes, including classic variations, regional twists, and contemporary updates from top bartenders around the country. All are accessible, delicious, and elegant in their simplicity, demonstrating the versatility and timelessness of the Old-Fashioned formula. 

With its rich history, stunning photography, and impeccable recipes, The Old-Fashioned is a celebration of one of America’s greatest bibulous achievements. It is a necessary addition to any true whiskey—or cocktail—lover’s bookshelf, and destined to become a classic on par with its namesake beverage.

Review

"an excellent history of the Old-Fashioned"
—Rien Fertel, The Wall Street Journal

"Robert Simonson is such an engaging author that he makes this the perfect book to accompany an easy chair and a well-made Old-Fashioned cocktail . . . An incisive, impeccably researched story of this too often forgotten classic cocktail, resulting in some good rollicking stories that American history is rich in."
—John Mariani, Huffington Post

"[...] you won’t be engrossed in his book just because of all the mythology surrounding this storied drink. It’s filled with gorgeous photos of the Old-Fashioned in its eponymous glass and with recipes (which comprise a good half of the book) both traditional and modern, swapping out the whiskey for pretty much every other spirit available."
—Ariana Auber, Austin American Statesman

"Simonson takes us on a witty and engaging tour through the drink’s long history and ends with recipes for traditional mixes and experimental twists. Like a good old-fashioned, his writing is dry but sweet; it’s got a kick, but is also low-key and best savored slowly."
 David Cote, Time Out New York

"If you like a little lore with your whiskey, then this book is for you. It covers the story of how this one drink has survived from the early 19th century, through Prohibition, and now back again to being one of our favorites. [...] Alone or with a bottle of rye, this makes for the perfect holiday gift for the drink lover on your list."
 —Maureen Petrosky, The Kitchn

About the Author

ROBERT SIMONSON, journalist and author, is one of the leading authorities on spirits and cocktail culture in the United States. Called “our man in the liquor-soaked trenches” by the New York Times, he has written extensively about cocktails, spirits, bars, and bartenders for the Times, as well as GQ, Wine Enthusiast, Wine Advocate, Imbibe, Edible Manhattan and Edible Brooklyn, and Time Out New York. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Preface

“I never treated it as just a cocktail.” 
—Doris Simonson

My mother never drank liquor until she was twenty-one. She followed the rules. But when she embarked on what would become a long drinking life, she did so with purpose and not a little forethought.

The first order of business was to find her drink. In those post–World War II days, when the cocktail hour was as inviolable a part of any day as sunrise and sunset, one had one’s drink. There was none of this flitting about from cocktail to cocktail. You found a mix that delighted the palate and soothed the mind in the right proportions and stuck by it.

She began with Manhattans. She liked the way they looked, shining like liquid embers inside a long-stemmed glass. But, after a while, they gave her headaches, which she blamed on the sweet vermouth. (Vermouth is ever the scapegoat.) She then tried Martinis, but found them daunting and dangerous. Finally, she found her level in the Old-Fashioned. Some of her reasoning was spurious. She’d ask for as much accompanying fruit as the bar could furnish as well as a healthy spurt of soda water, because, “even in those days, watching your weight was important.” But the remainder of her logic is hard to fault.

“A lot depends on why you’re having an Old-Fashioned,” she said, some sixty years after she sampled her first. “If you’re having one as a drink in the evening, you’d probably rather have a strong one, because you’re not going to have two Old-Fashioneds. If you’re at somebody’s home or visiting with people, it’s never just a cocktail. I never treated it as just a cocktail. To me, a cocktail was an avenue to socializing. Everyone did it. It was something we did while we were visiting and laughing and singing and talking. It was a tool to meet people and relax.

“I treated it as an all-purpose drink. I never went through this thing where you say, ‘Oh, it’s before dinner, so we need a before-dinner drink; or, it’s dinner, so we want something light; or it’s after dinner, etc.’ It was something I enjoyed drinking, and I could control what I wanted by telling the bartender not to put too much liquor in it, or to put a lot of fruit in it. You could almost make up the recipe for your Old-Fashioned.

“You find people’s personalities coming out in Old-Fashioneds. A lot of men will drink Old-Fashioneds, but they will tell the bartender, in no uncertain terms, ‘Very little, if anything, mixed in.’ Mostly, it turned out what they wanted was a bourbon on the rocks. They basically wanted a nice strong drink with plenty of ice cubes, so as it sat there it became a little more mellow. Whereas women basically wanted all the things that went with it.”
“And,” she concluded, “it’s so beautiful to look at.”

------------------

Col. Jim Gray’s 
 OLD-FASHIONED WHISKEY COCKTAIL 
New York Sun, 1908

“Colonel” Jim Gray enjoyed a thirty-year tenure behind the bar at New York’s Fifth Avenue Hotel. He contended that he had served the Old-Fashioned Whiskey Cocktail since 1881 and had, in fact, invented it. This is the recipe given to a New York Sun reporter in 1908 by Colonel Gray himself. This formula is patently not an Old-Fashioned, what with the lack of bitters and lemon peel and the presence of nutmeg. Most likely, the reporter mistakenly applied the name to the recipe for a Whiskey Toddy, another drink for which Gray was famous. Indeed, several bartenders wrote to the Sun protesting that Gray must have been misquoted. Nonetheless, this is the recipe we have. And, taken as such, it’s actually an excellent drink. The recipe below is adapted from Gray’s instructions to the Sun.

2 ounces bourbon or rye
1 sugar cube
Dash of nutmeg

Muddle the sugar cube, a barspoon of water, and a sprinkle of nutmeg in a mixing glass. Add the whiskey and ice. Attach tin to top of glass and shake the drink. Strain the drink into an Old-Fashioned glass. Dust with nutmeg. “And, for heavens sake,” as the Colonel said, “no bitters.”

Product information

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Videos

Help others learn more about this product by uploading a video!
Upload video
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Similar brands on Amazon

Sponsored

Customer reviews

4.8 out of 54.8 out of 5
428 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Observer
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Uncommon Knowledge
Reviewed in the United States on July 30, 2016
Make no mistake; this is a good book and a must have for anyone who wants to sit down and read the history of a particular cocktail. And, as would be expected, there are more than a few recipes to play with, all of which sound fine except the bacon fat Old Fashioned and... See more
Make no mistake; this is a good book and a must have for anyone who wants to sit down and read the history of a particular cocktail. And, as would be expected, there are more than a few recipes to play with, all of which sound fine except the bacon fat Old Fashioned and that thing they drink in Wisconsin, but to each his own.

Simonson traces the history of the drink as best it can be traced, through old bartenders manuals and newspaper clippings filling in here and there with anecdotes of some of the more colorful characters one expects to meet on such a journey. It''s also important, or I think it is, that younger fans of good cocktails be grounded in some history, particularly how Prohibition adversely affected our drinking habits. There isn''t simply a cocktail renaissance occurring, but an American whiskey renaissance producing high quality spirits that are better than anything made before Prohibition. A few years ago,George T. Stagg Bourbon, a 140 proof masterpiece was chosen in a blind tasting by international experts as the finest spirit in the world. Take that brandy lovers.

Cards on the table; I am an Old Fashioned snob, and I suspect Simonson is as well. I''m a bourbon man and my gut tells me he''s a rye man, but that same gut tells me neither one of us would turn down a good quality dram of the other. He seems to have a preference for the earlier recipes and he seems to have a particular disdain for the fruits. He makes several disparaging remarks about "fruit salads" and "the garbage" in the drink. This is where he comes up short, and he didn''t have to because he had the reasoning in his hands, David Embury''s "The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks." In fact he commits an unforgivable sin - he chastises Mr. Embury.

David Embury, by his own admission, "trumpeting" would be a better word, notes he is just a "mixer upper" of drinks at home and not associated with the liquor business at all. He wrote a classic: "The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks" in 1948 (erroneously reported in one part of the book as 1958, obviously a typo, but later corrected to 1948) a second, updated edition in paperback was released a few years later, but it is not a book of recipes, rather a text on the fundamentals of spirituous liquors and cocktail mixing that are as valid today as the day he wrote them. Of course Mr. Embury, who died in 1958, discusses the Old Fashioned as one of the six basic cocktails. Simonson tells us Mr. Embury contradicts himself by appearing simultaneously to favor a simple drink unadorned with fruit and then tells us how good fruits blend with American whiskeys (they do). But Embury wasn''t writing a book about making original recipes. He was instructing the readers on the basics and then showing them how to build on that. Simonson himself notes that the architecture of the Old Fashioned allows "mixologists" a great deal of latitude to create good tasting drinks within its template. Embury was doing that for all cocktails. The Old Fashioned as an aperitif, he tell us, should have little or no fruit in it at all. As a mid summer''s drink, feel free to load up on oranges, pineapples, and what have you, according to your tastes. His was not a book for purists.

Simonson is on firmer ground when he criticizes Mr. Embury for disdaining the use of water in cocktails. But even here there is a misunderstanding. Embury was loathe to use water as an ingredient in quantities as large as that of the liquor. But he had no problem insisting on cracked ice in an Old Fashioned, which melts quickly and dilutes the drink. At least it does it slowly. And it''s been more than 65 years since the book was published. We know things now about how a drop or two of water can release some flavors in the whiskey that we might otherwise miss. I''m sure if Mr. Embury were alive today, he would change his mind when confronted with the scientific evidence, as he enjoyed the bonanza of fine American whiskeys unavailable to him in his lifetime. Somewhat dated or not, his book is a must have.

But where they really part ways is on the business of muddling the fruit, an awful practice that, should it stop, would prevent some truly dreadful drinks from being served. Embury points out what Simonson misses. Muddling or crushing orange rind releases a very bitter oil that adds nothing to the drink''s flavor no matter how steeped in denial a drinker might be. This not true of a lemon rind (or an orange peel), whose bitter oil, in much smaller quantities, adds to the flavor of the drink. I agree the cherry, muddled or not, doesn''t add much, so don''t make a beautiful drink ugly by mashing up one, but plop it in if you like the look.

What doesn''t seem to bother Simonson at all is the unnecessary process of muddling the sugar cube after soaking it in bitters. Simple syrup, used sparingly (after being made in ratios different than he suggests) can be mixed with the bitters in seconds while muddling the sugar cube to the point where it will actually dissolve is time consuming and produces nothing of superior value to the flavor of the drink.

What does make a difference is the quality of the whiskey. Simonson suggests some very good ones including Elijah Craig 12 year old, a $70 quality bourbon selling for about $35.00. He also mentions the truly excellent Rittenhouse Bottled in Bond Rye (a bourbon drinker''s rye) and Bulleit Rye (they also make a good bourbon). During prohibition some seriously revolting concoctions were dreamed up to hide the flavor of some really awful whiskey (much of it Canadian). The Old Fashioned is not one of those drinks. Using a high quality liquor, even one that might be considered "too good" to drink any other way than neat, produces a real gourmet''s delight.

What doesn''t bother Simonson at all, and that which makes me cringe, is the scotch Old Fashioned. Most scotches and all blended ones have a smoky taste that does not blend well with fruit, muddled or decorative, or much of anything else that has a distinctive flavor. Scotch is scotch and people like it, but there is a reason it is used in highballs and drunk neat or on the rocks. It has limited use in a cocktail. What doesn''t make the list of ingredients for an interesting Old Fashioned, and perhaps should have, is Irish Whiskey. A pot stilled Irish has sufficient body to make a decent cocktail and lacks the smoky taste of scotch. But Simonson impresses when he casually mentions that a good quality Applejack makes a great Old Fashioned. There are very few people today who even know what Applejack is. It is nearly as versatile as American Whiskey and can be used in a variety of cocktails. It is reasonably priced and should be in everyone''s liquor cabinet.

Like I said, I''m an Old Fashioned snob and the ultimate determining factor is the pallet of the person drinking it. It''s your money, drink it as you see fit, but save some of your money for this wonderful little book and amaze your friends with your new found knowledge of the lineage of the true King of the Cocktails. Enjoy one while you read.
45 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Johnson Wei
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Chic Way of Expressing Old Fashioneds.
Reviewed in the United States on August 26, 2015
This book is a short read that eventually becomes a quick reference guide for the endless variations on the classic Old Fashioned cocktail. This hard covered book is a luxury in itself; just when you thought that an Old Fashioned just comprises of a sugar cube, bitters and... See more
This book is a short read that eventually becomes a quick reference guide for the endless variations on the classic Old Fashioned cocktail. This hard covered book is a luxury in itself; just when you thought that an Old Fashioned just comprises of a sugar cube, bitters and your choice of bourbon; you thought wrong! There are literally hundreds of different ways that you can perfect this time-tested libation. I''ve learned throughout the years that this isn''t just a drink, but an experience. What will you substitute the sweetness with when you''re simply out of sugar? Can wine or liqueurs act as a bitters replacement? How far are you willing to go to redefine the limits of the Old Fashioned?
10 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Aaron S
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
wordy
Reviewed in the United States on June 30, 2021
half the book is history for the drink. recipes are written for bartenders
One person found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Donald Stone
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Wonderful book, worthwhile to read for any fan of ...
Reviewed in the United States on May 19, 2016
Wonderful book, worthwhile to read for any fan of Old Fashioned or any mixed drinks. The author''s storytelling was quite entertaining, well written. As one of the Mid-South area, I was quite intrigued by Mr Simonson''s mention of the first reference to the Whiskey Cocktail... See more
Wonderful book, worthwhile to read for any fan of Old Fashioned or any mixed drinks. The author''s storytelling was quite entertaining, well written. As one of the Mid-South area, I was quite intrigued by Mr Simonson''s mention of the first reference to the Whiskey Cocktail as a "FASHION-able accompaniment" by the Memphis Daily Appeal of late 1800s, prior being christened as the Old Fashioned. Well done and my compliments, Mr Simonson!!!
One person found this helpful
Helpful
Report
lionknockout61
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Old fashions never goes out of style.
Reviewed in the United States on October 23, 2020
The most comprehensive book featuring the different recipes of the classic Old Fashioned drink.
Helpful
Report
emily
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Exactly what you see
Reviewed in the United States on December 9, 2019
Gave this to my
Boyfriend as a gift with an old fashioned glass set and ice cube mold maker and he’s tried a new cocktail each week. Really loves the ones that
Call for maple syrup
Helpful
Report
CTB
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
... so he brings a wealth of knowledge and a wonderful writing style to his favorite drink
Reviewed in the United States on July 6, 2014
Simonson’s day job is writing about cocktails for the New York Times so he brings a wealth of knowledge and a wonderful writing style to his favorite drink: The Old-Fashioned. He has done an impressive amount of research into the history of the drink, which he covers in... See more
Simonson’s day job is writing about cocktails for the New York Times so he brings a wealth of knowledge and a wonderful writing style to his favorite drink: The Old-Fashioned. He has done an impressive amount of research into the history of the drink, which he covers in the first 65 pages of the book. The next 93 pages consist of both old recipes and new variations for the Old-Fashioned. If you are a fan of the Old-Fashioned, this is a book you should seriously consider adding to your cocktail library.
5 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Christine A
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great Book for an Old-Fashioned Drinker
Reviewed in the United States on February 7, 2018
Purchased for an Old-Fashioned drinker and he really enjoyed the history and the recipies.
One person found this helpful
Helpful
Report

Top reviews from other countries

Davelovesyou
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Slightly disappointing and didn’t provide the answer I wanted.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 4, 2019
I was looking for the elusive Old Fashioned recipe. Once in a while you get a really good one in the odd bar, but sometimes they’re disappointing to. I thought that a book dedicated to them would provide me with the perfect recipe, but I fortunately it didn’t. It’s mildly...See more
I was looking for the elusive Old Fashioned recipe. Once in a while you get a really good one in the odd bar, but sometimes they’re disappointing to. I thought that a book dedicated to them would provide me with the perfect recipe, but I fortunately it didn’t. It’s mildly interesting, but I don’t think it will be looked at again. In the meantime, I’ve discovered that a good dose of angosturas bitters and a good dose of simple sugar syrup can make a beautiful Old Fashioned once you get the combination right.
Report
Anna
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great Book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 9, 2019
Well presented book. Hard cover and really smooth exterior. Book is full of information and recipes. Can''t wait to gift it at Christmas.
Report
Devin Landers
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Complete Book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 4, 2019
This book is a fantastic history of the old fashioned. Beautifully written and the pictures are amazing.
Report
MD_london
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 18, 2018
Slightly smaller then hoped but still very good
Report
moggy
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
drink up & enjoy
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 19, 2016
this is a very good book ,with some really good advice on how to make a cocktail
Report
See all reviews
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

More items to explore

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Pages with related products.

  • gifts for history lovers
  • food lover gifts
  • brand story
  • classic novels
  • classics books

The Old-Fashioned: lowest The popular Story of the World's First Classic Cocktail, with Recipes and Lore outlet sale

The Old-Fashioned: lowest The popular Story of the World's First Classic Cocktail, with Recipes and Lore outlet sale

The Old-Fashioned: lowest The popular Story of the World's First Classic Cocktail, with Recipes and Lore outlet sale

The Old-Fashioned: lowest The popular Story of the World's First Classic Cocktail, with Recipes and Lore outlet sale

The Old-Fashioned: lowest The popular Story of the World's First Classic Cocktail, with Recipes and Lore outlet sale

The Old-Fashioned: lowest The popular Story of the World's First Classic Cocktail, with Recipes and Lore outlet sale

The Old-Fashioned: lowest The popular Story of the World's First Classic Cocktail, with Recipes and Lore outlet sale

The Old-Fashioned: lowest The popular Story of the World's First Classic Cocktail, with Recipes and Lore outlet sale

The Old-Fashioned: lowest The popular Story of the World's First Classic Cocktail, with Recipes and Lore outlet sale

The Old-Fashioned: lowest The popular Story of the World's First Classic Cocktail, with Recipes and Lore outlet sale

The Old-Fashioned: lowest The popular Story of the World's First Classic Cocktail, with Recipes and Lore outlet sale

The Old-Fashioned: lowest The popular Story of the World's First Classic Cocktail, with Recipes and Lore outlet sale

The Old-Fashioned: lowest The popular Story of the World's First Classic Cocktail, with Recipes and Lore outlet sale

The Old-Fashioned: lowest The popular Story of the World's First Classic Cocktail, with Recipes and Lore outlet sale

The Old-Fashioned: lowest The popular Story of the World's First Classic Cocktail, with Recipes and Lore outlet sale

The Old-Fashioned: lowest The popular Story of the World's First Classic Cocktail, with Recipes and Lore outlet sale